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Peter Smith Named 2010 Lambert Fellow

Local author, teacher, and writer Peter Smith is this year’s Lambert Fellow. Named in honor of former English Teacher Bryce Lambert, the fellowship furthers the possibility of writing careers to students and faculty. Mr. Smith will head to campus on the week of April 26.

Mr. Smith’s impressive writing career made him a perfect candidate for this year’s Lambert Fellowship. According to his official resume, Mr. Smith edited a major publication (O the Oprah Magazine), taught at the graduate and undergraduate college level, and published numerous works of fiction and nonfiction in The New Yorker, The New York Times, Life, O the Oprah Magazine, and many others.

Mr. Smith also ghostwrites, or writes for pieces of which he was not the official author; he has ghostwritten nine pieces throughout a variety of fields. Ghostwriters often receive no credit for their work as predetermined by a contract made between the author and ghostwriter. Contributions can range from writing entire chapters of books to editing already completed works. In Mr. Smith’s case, he was hired by other authors to add on to their work.

Even beyond having an exciting career, Mr. Smith’s ability to relate to the boarding school life made him a more appealing candidate. As English Teacher Sonja O’Donnell, who identifies the Lambert Fellow each year and brought Mr. Smith to DA, asserted, “He knows us.”

Having grown up as a ‘faculty-brat,’ Mr. Smith attended Milton Academy and went on to study in France, in Australia, and finally at Columbia University. He now lives in the Pioneer Valley, allowing him to connect with our community on a deeper level.

Another advantage of Mr. Smith’s local proximity to campus is his availability to share his knowledge. Contrary to most speakers who make one speech and leave, Mr. Smith will be available the majority of the week and also speak at school meeting on April 27. He will potentially visit classes, meals, and other activities. Mrs. O’Donnell describes him as a “fine communicator” and a “wonderful person to invite into the classroom.”